What's new here?

Posts tagged ‘microscope’

Spectrum Scientifics Microscope Buyer’s Guide – REPOST

The holidays have us pretty busy, so here is our Microscope Buyer’s guide for those seeking to buy one!

Spectrum Scientifics Microscope Buyers Guide

Congratulations! You’ve decided to buy a microscope! A microscope is a wonderful instrument that can fascinate kids and adults alike. With proper care, a microscope can last a lifetime. But buying a microscope can be confusing for the first time buyer. There are so many different designs, it can be a bit overwhelming. This guide should help you make the proper choice in deciding on a microscope model.

First let’s start by discussing the different designs of microscope. We will break microscopes into three different categories: Compound Microscopes , Inspection/Dissection Microscopes, and ‘Other’. We’ll cover these one by one.

Compound/Biological Microscopes : Compound (or Biological) microscopes are the models designed to be used with slides. They are high powered; using multiple objective lenses (the lenses that point at the slide) to typically provide 40X, 100X, 400X and sometimes 1000X right off the shelf. Modern compound microscopes usually have some sort of illumination from below to light up the slide. Depending on the design of the compound microscope it may have features like binocular eyepieces (two eyepieces, but do not provide stereo vision) a mechanical stage for moving the slide easily, coarse and fine focus (for easy focusing) and different lighting designs.

The disadvantage of a compound microscope is that you pretty much must use it with slides. You can’t just plop a bug, coin, or plant leaf onto the microscope and expect to get a decent image. Compounds aren’t designed to do that. You can cut up the leaf/bug/whatever and make it into a slide with some effort and a slide-making kit, but that does take some time and only lets you view s small part of the the found object.

Inspection/Dissection Microscopes: Inspection/Dissection microscopes are designed to be used with any object you can fit on the microscope’s staging area. This can be coins, stamps, bugs, plant parts, circuit boards, small animals, or whatever else you might find. Inspection Microscopes often have much lower magnification (10x-40x is typical), much wider viewing fields, and very often the binocular versions give true stereo vision. This allows the viewer to ‘work’ (I.e. dissect) on the object being viewed and get a true sense of depth of objects like coins. Inspection Microscopes may have only 1-2 levels of magnification verses the 3-4 on compound microscopes. The microscope will also have top-down lighting, and some may have bottom-up lighting as well. The eyepieces used in many mid-range inspection microscopes are often larger and more comfortable to use.

The disadvantage of a compound microscope is that its magnification is very low and you cannot use it with slides. That means if you want to see cells, bacteria, or other very tiny objects you will need to get a compound microscope as well.

As you can tell from these write-ups, these two designs are very different from each other. Before we discuss the third category, let’s compare and contrast these two designs:

Features: Compound Microscopes vs. Inspection/Dissection Microscopes

Compound Inspection/Dissection
Magnification High: 40x and up Low: 10-40x typical
Levels of Magnification 3, sometimes 4 (40x, 100x 400x typical) 1 or 2*
Lighting From Bottom From top (or top and bottom)
Viewing Monocular or Binocular, but not true stereo Stereo Binocular
Viewable Objects Slides Coins, stamps, bugs, plants, circuit boards, etc.
Extra Features (depends on model) Mechanical Stage, Coarse & Fine Focus, Bottom light
    *Some models of Inspection Microscope have a continuous zoom from 10x to 30 or 40x

This chart should give you some idea of the basic comparison.

We haven’t forgotten about the third category of microscope: Other. This category covers some odd designs that work as specialty instruments. Some examples of Other microscopes would be:

Hand-Held Microscope: These are small, pocket-sized microscopes used in a fashion similar to Inspection/Dissection microscopes. They may have higher magnification than Inspection microscopes (30-100x power), often have a built in light, and are light and portable. Their main disadvantage is they have a limited viewing field- you must put the scope directly on the object being viewed. Their optics & lighting are also rarely up to the quality of full-sized microscopes, and moving to find a specific part of an object can be tricky. Still they are great in the field where a full-size microscope would be unwieldy.

Digital Microscopes: Many traditional microscopes can have a digital camera built into their structure, or can have their eyepiece replaced with a digital camera. But some microscopes are designed from the ground up to be used as high-power digital microscopes. These items have no eyepiece, only a CCD camera and an objective lens. They may have fixed or variable magnification, and the computer screen resolution will vary from model to model. Many ‘toy’-like designs have VGA quality graphics, which is 480 x 640. This level of quality is acceptable for kid’s use but is not sufficiently detail for any real work or study. Usually 1.3 Megapixels is the highest quality available for devoted consumer digital microscopes. If you desire higher resolution a compound microscope with a digital microscope eyepiece might be in order.

High Power Magnifiers: A hand-held magnifier is a very different instrument from a microscope, seeing as how most magnifiers have about 2-3x magnification and microscopes can go as high as 1000x. But some close work magnifiers have very high power (10x and up) and the line between a microscope and a magnifier starts to get blurred. As far as optical design goes, they are still very different animals: The magnifier has just one lens (or set of cemented lenses) while the microscope has both an objective and eyepiece lens. Although the difference is there, the jobs they cover get blurred. If you need a lower powered microscope or a high power magnifier, make certain you are choosing the correct tool for your viewing needs.

Hybrid Microscopes: Given the difference in use between a compound and an inspection microscope it didn’t take to long for some folks to come up with a design that tries to do the job of both microscopes. Usually this is done by taking a compound microscope design and adding a top-down light to the system. These designs can be a great boon to parents or buyers who cannot decide which usage they would prefer. The disadvantage is that like many other things that try to do multiple jobs, they are not the best at either job. Most often hybrid microscopes are better at being a compound microscope than an inspection microscope (mostly due to the higher powers of a compound microscope), but at least the option for using the microscope both ways is available. Consider a hybrid if you can’t decide between designs, but remember it won’t do the job as well as a devoted microscope.

Toy Microscopes: Many ‘toy’ microscopes are available on the market, usually they are either plastic hand-held models or plastic versions of compound designs. The former can be great fun for small children who would like to have something to view nature close-up but can still handle their not-always-delicate hands. The latter, however, is usually to be avoided. Cheap plastic bodies and cheap plastic lenses will give the viewer a very poor experience indeed. Companies that make these items often pile on junk accessories like plastic ‘viewers’, poor slide making accessories, and other gimmicks to cover the fact that the instrument is junk. Avoid these if at all possible.

OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER

So now that we’ve discussed the various microscope designs, we should talk about that are features of microscopes:

DIN Objectives: DIN stands for Deutsches Institut für Normung – Don’t worry about that. Just understand that DIN eyepieces are set to a higher standard the the average beginner microscope. DIN objectives are generally universal so you can take one DIN objective out of one microscope and thread it into another. DIN eyepieces are often a bit more costly.

Digital Microscope Eyepieces: Digital eyepieces can be a great boon to your viewing experience. When plugged into a computer they can be used to view objects on a much larger screen, and the images can be saved, modified, emailed, etc. Some digital eyepieces can make movies as well. Some microscopes have digital eyepieces built into the body of the microscope, but almost all non-toy microscopes can have their eyepiece’s removed and replaced with a digital microscope eyepiece. The image quality from a digital microscope eyepiece can go from VGA (or even TV) quality all the way up to 5.0 Megapixels or even more.

ACCESSORIES:

One nice feature about microscopes is that they don’t need a whole lot of accessories to get a good experience. But there are a few things you can get to increase your viewing experience:

Prepared Slides: Professionally made slides are always excellent to have around. They let you see objects with a quality that few can match. They also may be of specimens that may be very hard to obtain. Consider having a few prepared slides to enjoy.

Slide Making Kits: Sooner or later you will want to make your own slides. This will involve blank slides, coverslips, a razor (for cutting samples) and some mounting medium. These can be bought individually, but it is often more economical and convenient to buy a kit.

Special Slides: Blank slides with concave dips can be obtained for holding liquid samples. This is excellent for examining microscopic life in pond water and other sources.

Slide Boxes: Once you make your own slides you should store them properly in a slide box. Don’t leave them to get dust and scratches.

Microtome: If you make a lot of slides, cutting thin sample sections with a razor can get annoying after a while. A microtome can help. It is a mechanical device that helps cut a thin sliver off the sample. Think of them as working like the meat slicer at your deli only on a much smaller scale. Microtomes can be hand driven devices for around $75 to fancy automated item costing hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

CONCLUSIONS:

As mentioned above, before you decide on what model microscope you want, make sure you know what it is you want to do with it! Fun can be had viewing both prepared slides and making your own slides using a compound microscope. But it can also be a real thrill to take objects straight from the backyard, or even from your pockets and put them under an Inspection/Dissection microscope. If you have needs beyond having fun observing (research, coin collecting, etc), make certain that your microscope does that sort of job first and foremost.

Happy viewing!

The My First Lab Mini Duo Scope – Wait! A plastic lensed microscope?!

You read that right, today we are reviewing and carrying a microscope that not only has a plastic body but plastic lenses. You might wonder what has gone wrong with us, after all we’ve listed plastic bodies (and by extention plastic lenses) as one of the warning signs of a bad microscope. But bear with us:

First of all, our major concern with plastic bodies and plastic lenses is not that they are inferior by default, but rather than they often demonstrate a lack of care on the part of the microscope manufacturer. Plastic bodies are often cheaply done and have poor deign, seams, constructions. Plastic lenses are often just pressed in a mass mold with little to no quality control or concern about optical alignment.  Plastic is an indicator of poor construction & optics, but it is not the cause of a poor microscope. The fact is: a well designed plastic body can work just fine  if attention is paid to construction and how it will be used, and while plastic lenses may never match the quality of higher-end glass lenses, they can certainly work well as a low cost substitute that can match and defeat the quality of low end glass lenses.

The reason we bring this up is the recently released My First Lab Mini Duo Scope

5823

(more…)

The Universal Smartphone Microscope Part 2 – Testing

This is a continuation of the Universal Smartphone Microscope Part 1 entry.

So now that we’ve seen most of the characteristics of the Smartphone Microscope, let’s test it out. Right off the bat there is a small defect – the microscope comes with a leatherette carrying case, but that holds just the microscope part, not the clamp. So we kind of had to improvise:

2015-05-12 21.35.41

Now we attached the microscope to the smartphone. It very quickly becomes apparent that aligning the microscope to the smartphone camera lens isn’t hard, but getting it aligned exactly is much harder. This will become apparent when we start using the microscope.

When you first attach it and do some basic alignment you will note there is a lot of vignetting – so you will need to zoom in by using your touchscreen.

 

We started off taking images of a coin. A penny to be exact. The attached light was on and we had some struggles with the focuser. For our pruposes this the extending tube to focus may not be useful at all – we could have glued it down and saved some trouble. But we weren’t doing all microscope techniques, nor did our Smartphone have a caryying case to work over.  Here is how the penny looked:

2015-05-12 21.41.34

Not a bad image, although there is some glare from the light coming from the side – this side-lighting does have the advantage of giving some depth to three dimensional objects, but lacks the diversity of a ring-light illumination or inspection microscope’s top-down illumination.

You may also notice the image is a bit out of focus at the far left and right parts of the image. Better alignment might have solved this issue.

For fun I took an image of my finger:

2015-05-12 21.42.28

Then an image of a part of a magazine cover that was lying around:

2015-05-12 21.40.46

Then it was time to see how it does with other items, we took some microscope slides we had in the store. The first was a slide with 3 cross sections of plant leaves. Only two were visible i nthe field of view.

2015-05-13 11.05.07

We tried to move back and take an image of an housefly leg, but there were issues with focusing because the slide had been damaged before we tried to use it (the cover slip had lots of cracks)

2015-05-13 11.05.59

The final slide was some paramecium, we first tried it to see if there was a difference if we just used the UV light:

2015-05-13 11.06.31

There is a bit of a difference as you can see from the image taken under white light:

2015-05-13 11.07.08

Finally, just for tradition an image of a letter ‘S’ on a blue background was taken:

2015-05-13 11.09.18

As you can see if you expand these images, there was still some blurring at the edges. If had taken more time aligning the microscope we might have resolved this issue, but all things considered, we were impressed with the images we got, especially given that this is just a $12.95 microscope!

In conclusion – the Universal Smartphone Microscope is not a replacement for an actual microscope – mostly due to the edge focus and other minor issues – but for a low price you can have a decently powered microscope camera in the palm of your hand!

Want to buy the Universal Smartphone Microscope?

www.spectrum-scientifics.com

 

Microscope Slides – The How and the Why

Any compound microscope needs to use slides to view anything. While you can purchase prepared slides, there is a certain satisfaction, or outright professional need to makes one’s own slides. Fortunately, blank slides are available for purchase.  However there is a wide variety of slides available and some might get confused with what kinds of slides they need.

First of all is the basic slide: It is a 3″ x 1″ (75mm x 25mm) slip of glass about 1mm thick.

Several types of slides

Basic slides can be made of plastic, but glass is much preferred. Not all slides are created equal and Spectrum sells Premium slides that have a much lower scratch-dig rating than standard slides.

Standard slides are also available with a frosted end. The glass is ground on one end of one side of the slide that makes it opaque.  This is so that they can be labeled using a pencil without the need for stickers or other marks.  Some slides have frosting on both ends for more information.

These two types of slides are all most folks will need for their flat slides requirements.  The rest of the designs are needed in labs and industry.

Other slides go one step past the frosted end and have colored ends for labs where indexing the slides by type can be important.

These are important to labs where a lot of slides are produced and the lab needs to index the slides by type: white=bone samples, green=blood, etc. All the labels can be written on with pencil or felt-tip pen (sometimes ball-point).

There are also what are known as ‘charged’ slides. These are high-end microscope slides with a coating of a special adhesive formula (one side only!). This formula is very useful for getting specimens to ‘stick’ to the slide. These slides also have printed ends in varying colors.


For very large samples, there are even over-sized slides that are 3″ long by 2″ wide. These can also hold multiple samples for quick comparison:

These huge slides do have some issues: the are not as easy to handle, and they require a microscope with a large stage to fully take advantage of the size.

Now all of these slides are flat, which is fine for samples that need to be laid flat. This is fine for solid samples, or for liquids that are to be flattened underneath a cover slip. This is fine for observing dead materials, but what if you wish to observe living organism from say pond water or other sources? This is where concave slides come into play:

Concave slides are thicker than regular blank slides, and instead of a flat surface that have one or two small indentations that can hold liquids, such as the aforementioned pond water, blood or other liquids. This allows small creatures to be viewed without killing them. They may not be easy to find, but any water from a natural source should have some microscopic creatures in it.

Having a set of blank slides (and cover slips) at the ready is almost a requirement for owning a telescope. They are inexpensive and good to have when you find a new item to examine. Slide preparing kits can also help with stains and other materials to help prepare slides for viewing. Be sure to have some of these around if you plan to properly use your microscope.
www.spectrum-scientifics.com

Microscope Slide Warmers

In the field of biological or medical research, very often microscope slides need to be warmed when they are not in use – either to keep the life in them alive or to make certain certain actions or biochemical processes are taking place. Sometimes it just won’t do to look at a cold, dead slide! For the solution to this problem we have several models of slide warmers that can help in the lab!

The two first models are fairly simple in design: A small plate-top model that has a 10″ x 7″ top with dial controlled temperature and LED display:

3874large

A larger unit for more active labs comes with a 25″ x 8″ top:

3875large

This has sufficient space to warm quite a collection of slides.

You may notice that these models, while excellent, do have the issue of just being a flat plate that the slides are placed on. This is OK but taking slides off the plate with gloved hands (crucial in some fields) can sometimes be a bit tricky. Also in busy labs slides can be pushed around on the plate, causing some unwanted mixing. A solution to that end is the Step-Up Slide Warmer. Sometimes its best just to let the picture do the talking:

3873large

With this design the slide ends do not rest on the plate, making for easy retrieval. The stacked formation design also is more efficient and is able to hold twice as many slides as a plate model of the same size. Up to 40 slides can be warmed and the stacking system allows for much greater organization.

Oh, don’t forget that we also have been carrying a Microscope Stage Warmer for those who need to have their slides warmed while they are actually being observed!

TS-Stage Warmer

Want to purchase microscope slide & stage warmers?

www.spectrum-scientifics.com

The Micro-Wiz Digital Microscope

We’ve carried digital microscopes in the past, but the new Micro-Wiz is a great new entry into the field:

3585large

To start off with: the Micro-Wiz has resolution of up to 5.1 Megapixels via software on the 1/3″ CMOS chip.  The unit has magnification from 46x-525x, an auto-focus system, dual cool LED lights. The entire system is powered via a USB cable to your computer. The software operates on Windows XP, Vista, and Windows 7.

The head of the microscope can removed from the body to allow examination of objects that cannot be placed on the base. The dual lighting system allows illumination of objects when the head is removed. The dual operating system and magnification levels mean the Micr-Wiz can operate as both an Inspection Microscope or a Compound/Biological microscope.

So far the Micro-Wiz is the best student digital microscope that we have come across. Much higher resolution than other student models it comes close to quality of a professional digital instrument!

Interested in Digital Microscopes?

www.spectrum-scientifics.com

Spectrum Scientifics Microscope Buyer’s Guide – Repost

Things are still quite hectic in the store  so this is great time to repost our Microscope buyer’s guide. This is the time of year when many a budding biologist gets their first microscope!

 

Spectrum Scientifics Microscope Buyers Guide

Congratulations! You’ve decided to buy a microscope! A microscope is a wonderful instrument that can fascinate kids and adults alike. With proper care, a microscope can last a lifetime. But buying a microscope can be confusing for the first time buyer. There are so many different designs, it can be a bit overwhelming. This guide should help you make the proper choice in deciding on a microscope model.

First let’s start by discussing the different designs of microscope. We will break microscopes into three different categories: Compound Microscopes , Inspection/Dissection Microscopes, and ‘Other’. We’ll cover these one by one.

Compound/Biological Microscopes : Compound (or Biological) microscopes are the models designed to be used with slides. They are high Compund/Biological Microscopepowered; using multiple objective lenses (the lenses that point at the slide) to typically provide 40X, 100X, 400X and sometimes 1000X right off the shelf. Modern compound microscopes usually have some sort of illumination from below to light up the slide. Depending on the design of the compound microscope it may have features like binocular eyepieces (two eyepieces, but do not provide stereo vision) a mechanical stage for moving the slide easily, coarse and fine focus (for easy focusing) and different lighting designs.

The disadvantage of a compound microscope is that you pretty much must use it with slides. You can’t just plop a bug, coin, or plant leaf onto the microscope and expect to get a decent image. Compounds aren’t designed to do that. You can cut up the leaf/bug/whatever and make it into a slide with some effort and a slide-making kit, but that does take some time and only lets you view s small part of the the found object.

Inspection/Dissection Microscopes: Inspection/Dissection Inspection/Dissection Microscopemicroscopes are designed to be used with any object you can fit on the microscope’s staging area. This can be coins, stamps, bugs, plant parts, circuit boards, small animals, or whatever else you might find. Inspection Microscopes often have much lower magnification (10x-40x is typical), much wider viewing fields, and very often the binocular versions give true stereo vision. This allows the viewer to ‘work’ (I.e. dissect) on the object being viewed and get a true sense of depth of objects like coins. Inspection Microscopes may have only 1-2 levels of magnification verses the 3-4 on compound microscopes. The microscope will also have top-down lighting, and some may have bottom-up lighting as well. The eyepieces used in many mid-range inspection microscopes are often larger and more comfortable to use.

The disadvantage of a compound microscope is that its magnification is very low and you cannot use it with slides. That means if you want to see cells, bacteria, or other very tiny objects you will need to get a compound microscope as well.

As you can tell from these write-ups, these two designs are very different from each other. Before we discuss the third category, let’s compare and contrast these two designs:

Features: Compound Microscopes vs. Inspection/Dissection Microscopes

Compound Inspection/Dissection
Magnification High: 40x and up Low: 10-40x typical
Levels of Magnification 3, sometimes 4 (40x, 100x 400x typical) 1 or 2*
Lighting From Bottom From top (or top and bottom)
Viewing Monocular or Binocular, but not true stereo Stereo Binocular
Viewable Objects Slides Coins, stamps, bugs, plants, circuit boards, etc.
Extra Features (depends on model) Mechanical Stage, Coarse & Fine Focus, Bottom light
    *Some models of Inspection Microscope have a continuous zoom from 10x to 30 or 40x

This chart should give you some idea of the basic comparison.

We haven’t forgotten about the third category of microscope: Other. This category covers some odd designs that work as specialty instruments. Some examples of Other microscopes would be:

Hand-Held Microscope: These are small, pocket-sized microscopes used Hand Microscopein a fashion similar to Inspection/Dissection microscopes. They may have higher magnification than Inspection microscopes (30-100x power), often have a built in light, and are light and portable. Their main disadvantage is they have a limited viewing field- you must put the scope directly on the object being viewed. Their optics & lighting are also rarely up to the quality of full-sized microscopes, and moving to find a specific part of an object can be tricky. Still they are great in the field where a full-size microscope would be unwieldy.

Digital Microscopes: Many traditional microscopes can have a digital Digital Microscopecamera built into their structure, or can have their eyepiece replaced with a digital camera. But some microscopes are designed from the ground up to be used as high-power digital microscopes. These items have no eyepiece, only a CCD camera and an objective lens. They may have fixed or variable magnification, and the computer screen resolution will vary from model to model. Many ‘toy’-like designs have VGA quality graphics, which is 480 x 640. This level of quality is acceptable for kid’s use but is not sufficiently detail for any real work or study. Usually 1.3 Megapixels is the highest quality available for devoted consumer digital microscopes. If you desire higher resolution a compound microscope with a digital microscope eyepiece might be in order.

High Power Magnifiers: A hand-held magnifier is a very different 10X Triplet Magnifierinstrument from a microscope, seeing as how most magnifiers have about 2-3x magnification and microscopes can go as high as 1000x. But some close work magnifiers have very high power (10x and up) and the line between a microscope and a magnifier starts to get blurred. As far as optical design goes, they are still very different animals: The magnifier has just one lens (or set of cemented lenses) while the microscope has both an objective and eyepiece lens. Although the difference is there, the jobs they cover get blurred. If you need a lower powered microscope or a high power magnifier, make certain you are choosing the correct tool for your viewing needs.

Hybrid Microscopes: Given the difference in use between a compound and an inspection microscope it didn’t take to long for some folks to come up with a design that tries to do the job of both microscopes. Usually this is done by taking a compound microscope design and adding a top-down light to the system. These designs can be a great boon to parents or buyers who cannot decide which usage they would prefer. The disadvantage is that like many other things that try to do multiple jobs, they are not the best at either job. Most often hybrid microscopes are better at being a compound microscope than an inspection microscope (mostly due to the higher powers of a compound microscope), but at least the option for using the microscope both ways is available. Consider a hybrid if you can’t decide between designs, but remember it won’t do the job as well as a devoted microscope.

Toy Microscopes: Many ‘toy’ microscopes are available on the market, usually they are either plastic hand-held models or plastic versions of compound designs. The former can be great fun for small children who would like to have something to view nature close-up but can still handle their not-always-delicate hands. The latter, however, is usually to be avoided. Cheap plastic bodies and cheap plastic lenses will give the viewer a very poor experience indeed. Companies that make these items often pile on junk accessories like plastic ‘viewers’, poor slide making accessories, and other gimmicks to cover the fact that the instrument is junk. Avoid these if at all possible.

OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER

So now that we’ve discussed the various microscope designs, we should talk about that are features of microscopes:

DIN Objectives: DIN stands for Deutsches Institut für Normung – Don’t worry about that. Just understand that DIN eyepieces are set to a higher standard the the average beginner microscope. DIN objectives are generally universal so you can take one DIN objective out of one microscope and thread it into another. DIN eyepieces are often a bit more costly.

Digital Microscope Eyepieces: Digital eyepieces can be a great boon to Digital Microscope Eyepieceyour viewing experience. When plugged into a computer they can be used to view objects on a much larger screen, and the images can be saved, modified, emailed, etc. Some digital eyepieces can make movies as well. Some microscopes have digital eyepieces built into the body of the microscope, but almost all non-toy microscopes can have their eyepiece’s removed and replaced with a digital microscope eyepiece. The image quality from a digital microscope eyepiece can go from VGA (or even TV) quality all the way up to 5.0 Megapixels or even more.

ACCESSORIES:

One nice feature about microscopes is that they don’t need a whole lot of accessories to get a good experience. But there are a few things you can get to increase your viewing experience:

Prepared Slides: Professionally made slides are always excellent to have around. They let you see objects with a quality that few can match. They also may be of specimens that may be very hard to obtain. Consider having a few prepared slides to enjoy.

Slide Making Kits: Sooner or later you will want to make your own slides. This will involve blank slides, coverslips, a razor (for cutting samples) and some mounting medium. These can be bought individually, but it is often more economical and convenient to buy a kit.

Special Slides: Blank slides with concave dips can be obtained for holding liquid samples. This is excellent for examining microscopic life in pond water and other sources.

Slide Boxes: Once you make your own slides you should store them properly in a slide box. Don’t leave them to get dust and scratches.

Microtome: If you make a lot of slides, cutting thin sample sections with a razor can get annoying after a while. A microtome can help. It is a mechanical device that helps cut a thin sliver off the sample. Think of them as working like the meat slicer at your deli only on a much smaller scale. Microtomes can be hand driven devices for around $75 to fancy automated item costing hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

CONCLUSIONS:

As mentioned above, before you decide on what model microscope you want, make sure you know what it is you want to do with it! Fun can be had viewing both prepared slides and making your own slides using a compound microscope. But it can also be a real thrill to take objects straight from the backyard, or even from your pockets and put them under an Inspection/Dissection microscope. If you have needs beyond having fun observing (research, coin collecting, etc), make certain that your microscope does that sort of job first and foremost.

Happy viewing!