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Posts tagged ‘Classroom kits’

New Classroom Chemistry Kits

Recently we have added a few classroom kits to our product line. These kits are meant for middle & high school classes, and cover a wide range of chemistry topics. Let’s start off with the  Food Chemistry Kit:

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Topics covered in this kit are detecting the presence of sugars, fats, starches. Chemical composition of milk. Quintity of Vitamin C, and much more. All materials are included except for the food to be tested (trust us, you didn’t want us shipping milk…)

Next up is the Flame Test and Spectroscopy kit:

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With this kit, one of the important chemical detection methods: spectroscopy is employed. Various test chemicals are provided, along with wire loops and a spectroscope. The only thing lacking is a bunsen burner. The kit has enough material for 50 students.

Veering into the field of Environmental Chemistry we now carry the Atmosphere is Crisis kit

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With this kit, students will create pollutants as well as employ methods to treat and remove them. The effects of pollutants on metals and plants is also covered. Its an excellent way to show how pollution effects our everyday lives. All items are included but an overhead projector will be required for some of the teacher’s transparencies.

Interested in more Classroom Chemistry Products?

www.spectrum-scientifics.com

What’s in the Soil? A classroom soil-testing kit.

We have been adding more classroom items of late, and one of interest is the ‘What’s in the Soil’ kit from American Educational. The kit is large enough for 30 students to run tests.

Using ordinary soil, students perform test such as soil nutrient & mineral analysis (testing for over 10 nutrients & minerals) to determine the effectiveness of plant growth. Students also will determine water content, organic matter content & pH levels. Several soil samples are included in case local soil does not have enough variation.

The kit includes a 9 page teacher’s guide and covers 12 different activities. The kit is designed for students from grades 6-12 9age 11-18).

www.spectrum-scientifics.com

Biochemistry Classroom Kits

Part of the ‘side effects’ of the new electrophoresis sets we’ve added is that there need to be some classroom projects for teachers & students who want to use them. Well, when that happens next thing you know you’ve got all kinds of potential classroom labs to run! We’ve listed a few new biochemistry kits, some of them involve the electrophoresis apparatus, but others stand alone.

All of these kits are designed to handle sixteen students, operating in pairs. Activities take approximately 1 hour or two 1-hour sessions.

First up is the Properties of DNA Classroom Kit

In this lab, students will unravel Calf thymus DNA and spool it onto a glass rod. The materials provided include the DNA solution, and the materials to precipitate the DNA fibers. The DNA fibers can be up to 4cm long. The spooling is possible due to the double-helix nature of DNA. Students will learn about this and other properties of DNA. This classroom kit provides all materials except the very commonly available alcohol.The kit is just $104.95 and covers 16 students working in pairs.

Now the names might start to get a little long, as the next kit is Effects of Temperature on Cell Respiration

In this lab students use calibrated respirometers to measure the oxygen consumption and other factors in germinating grains. The exercise introduces students to a fundamental biological process and provides insight into seed structure and germination. This lab covers 16 students working in pairs. The kit costs $129.95 and includes the seeds and respirometers.

Taking advantage of the new Electrophoresis Apparatuses the next kits require the class have them available. The first kit is a simple, low cost Introduction to Electrophoresis

Costing just $47.95, this kit is a two-part lab where students identify unknown dye molecules by comparing their electrophoretic migration with the migration of known dyes. In the second part students identify dye molecules that bind to DNA and determine the mechanism. The exercise was designed for 8 groups of students and includes four colorful dye mixtures and DNA.

Hope you enjoyed that simple title, because next up is the impressively-named Specifity of Albumin Binding Classroom Kit, another lab involving electrophoresis equipment.

With this kit (no separate picture, sorry) we’ll just let the description speak for the kit:

“The binding of an enzyme to its substrate is only one example of the many specific molecular interactions that occur in biological systems. An analogous binding process occurs with serum albumin, which binds certain small molecular weight compounds and serves as a carrier molecule for these compounds in blood. In this exercise, students use an electrophoretic assay to examine the binding of various dyes to albumin. The results of this graphic analysis show that the binding of dyes to albumin is saturable, specific, compatible, and dependent on the native structure of the protein. The exercise is designed such that each of the eight groups of students performs a different experiment. Each group then describes their results and conclusion to the entire class. This exercise is a valuable experience in analyzing data and provides a fine introduction to enzyme kinetics. ”

OK, the final kit, which also uses Electrophoresis equipment, is a mouthful in the title alone: Electrophoretic and Chromatographic Analysis of Photosynthetic Pigments from Blue-Green Algae

Phew!

Again, we have to let the kit description do the talking:

“Cyanobactera, also known as blue-green algae, obtain their energy by photosynthesis using sunlight as their energy source. These organisms have been considered to be the oldest and the most important bacteria on the earth. It is believed that they were responsible for the initial oxygenation of the earth’s atmosphere through photosynthesis and it is also felt they were the precursors to the chloroplasts that are found in true algae and plants. There are two classes of photosynthetic pigments in Cyanobactera. The first class contains water-soluble proteins and the major protein is called Phycocyanin, which is blue. The other classes of photosynthetic pigments that include the carotinoids and chlorophylls are small molecular weight molecules and are insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents such as alcohol. In this laboratory exercise, 8 groups of students isolate and characterize both groups of pigments. In part A of this exercise, students prepare a water-soluble extract from blue green algae and show that it contains the single major protein Phycocyanin by electrophoresis as shown in the gel below. They also determine the charge of this protein by comparing its electrophoretic mobility to the mobilities of dyes with known charges. In part B, they prepare an alcohol extract and analyze the smaller alcohol soluble pigments by thin layer chromatography in order to identify the chlorophylls and major carotenoid pigments. The results of this two-part study give students practical hands-on experience with isolation of components from cells as well as electrophoresis and thin layer chromatography and introduces them to one of the most important organisms on the earth. ”

Despite the long name and description, this kit also handles 16 students in pairs, and costs under $130!

These kits are excellent for schools or homeschooling groups efforts. They are economical and include excellent instructions. They are an excellent addition to any Biochem class’s curriculum.

Want to buy Classroom Biology Kits & Equipment?

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Electrophoresis Kits – Part 2 Time for the Classroom.

So in part 1 we introduced you to the new line of Electrophoresis Apparatus for use in lab or classroom.

Trouble is, an Electrophoresis Apparatus doesn’t do very much on its own. There are actually accessories needed to get it operational, and that is why for labs that are just getting into Electrophoresis. Some things, like the Agarose, is a consumable. Other items, such as the power supply, and a pipettor are crucial to electrophoresis. So several kits have been assembled to get all the hardware in place.

First is the EL-100 Demonstration Kit, this includes a EL-100 Electrophoresis Apparatus, Power Supply, Adjustable Volume Pipettor, and an Experiment Kit: Introduction to Electrophoresis

Parts not shown: Pipettor, Power Supply, Experiment Kit.

For more serious work in the classroom, a classroom kit has been set up using the EL-600 Apparatus with its 6 gel trays – This classroom kit comes with two pipettors (50ul) 2 racks of pipettor tips, power supply and EL-600 Apparatus:

For full classroom experimentation, more than a single Electrophoresis Apparatus will be required, for that there are two stations set up to handle groups of 16 (dual Station) or 32 students (Four Stations).

The Dual stations come using either the EL-100 (each with single 7cm x 14cm trays) or EL-200 (with two 7cm x 7cm trays per apparatus).

The Dual stations include two electrophoresis apparatuses, a power supply, and 2 adjustable volume pipettors:

The Dual Station El-1oo and Dual Station El-200 can support up 16 students

The Four Station Electrophoresis Kits also come with the EL-100 or the EL-200

The Four Station Kits include 4 of the appropriate electrophoresis apparatuses, 2 power supplies, and 4 adjustable volume pipettors.

In part 3, we will discuss the classroom kits available.

Want to buy Electrophoresis & Biology Classroom equipment?

www.spectrum-scientifics.com